Autism

I can’t celebrate

I should be celebrating.

I should be feeling proud and happy, that we have achieved so much in such a short space of time.

Both Ian and I attended Lachlan’s support plan review meeting yesterday, the meeting was very positive, everyone was amazed at how much progress Lachlan has made in the last year. Lachlan has made considerable progress in all areas except food and toilet training, don’t get me wrong, everyone who knows me will tell you how proud I am of Lachlan and how pleased I am with how far he has come, what I am really struggling with right now is how much all this progress has cost and I don’t mean in monetary terms.

I never realised until this last week how much was sacrificed to make it all happen and how much damage was being caused because all my time, energy and focus was consumed by the need to meet Lachlan’s targets and care for Lachlan’s needs.

I wonder if I am the only additional needs parent to feel overwhelmed by guilt, sadness and a sense of failure?

I feel I have let Lachlan’s two older siblings down by never having enough time to spend proper quality time with either of them.

I thought as parents we were juggling all three children’s needs well, only I now see that both were only telling us and letting us see what we wanted to see, because both could see how much of our time Lachlan takes up and neither of the older two wanted to add to our stress. Both have hidden from us how they really felt, as a Mum this breaks my heart. I realised this week I didn’t even know the sort of things one of my children was interested in, what bands this child liked, the names of this child’s friends.

Yet this child tells people who ask, that their Mum and Dad are the best and that they try really hard to be the best for them.

For four and a half years; all day every day has been about Lachlan,

it has had to be.

I just wish I had realised before now, sometimes it is only when you stop and reflect that things become clear, at the time I was too caught up in there and then. Sadly it has been the case that life for us all is bearable if all Lachlan’s needs are met and he is happy.

I know we have to find a better way. Problem is how?

We are lucky that we have support from our family who happily take the older two and give them 1-1 time, but what both older children crave is 1-1 time with me and their dad by the sounds of things preferably on their own. I don’t know how we can spread ourselves any thinner?

I met with our disability social worker this week, again I raised the issue of support for Lachlan during holidays and perhaps some time during an occasional weekend, this would give us time in theory when we know Lachlan is safe and we could focus on our older two, all we are going to be offered is the equivalent to two hours a week with a childminder and only during the Summer holidays. That works out at 16 hours over 8 weeks, that is the most social work can afford. I asked about SDS and direct payments, yes we can apply but apparently it is pointless as there are no child centred services in our region we could buy, plus apparently parents are expected to carry out the caring roll where it concerns children. The fact Lachlan can be in need of 2-1 care at times is apparently irrelevant.

I will find away to make things better for my older two, I guess we just learn to juggle better, to try harder, there isn’t really any other option.

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Autism

This is Autism, the hidden disability

I started this blog as I wanted to create a positive space to show how far we have come, don’t get me wrong my magical wee man has moved mountains to get to where we are today, in this post I am going to be 100% honest with the world about the complete living hell, living with Autism is not just for Lachlan but for his brother and sister and us his parents. This post has been bubbling and building in me for months, I am at breaking point now, exhausted, broken and deeply hurt, this is the result of the constant battle against ignorant people, a system that doesn’t work and an uncaring world.

Every thoughtless coment, wounds.

I now fully understand what other parents meant when they referred to Autism as the hidden disability.

Do you have any idea how much my little boy suffers?

Do you have any idea how much my bigger boy and little girl suffer?

Do you know how much strain my marriage has been put under?

Do you have any idea how much it hurts to feel powerless to make any of it better?

Can you stop and imagine for just one second how heartbroken you would feel if it was your family I was writing about?

So where to begin?

Lachlan will be 5 in 5 months time. Five a massive milestone for every child, the age at which in our country a child starts school.

Lachlan doesn’t look anything like an almost five year old, he is tiny, he wears age 3-4 clothing and even that is a recent development. I find myself these days having to remind myself he won’t be 3 or 4 on his next Birthday, he will be 5 and that he will start school in August.

Lachlan is going to attend an additional needs unit with a shared placement at our local amazing Catholic primary school, he will have 1:1 care full time. Either Lachlan’s dad or myself will always be available whilst Lachlan is at school should we be needed.

Lachlan’s world is a completely unrecognisable place in comparison to that of your avarage four and a half year old child or that avarage four and a half year old childs parents, let me tell you some more about it.

Lachlan can’t, won’t, doesn’t eat solid food, with the exception of baby rice cakes, jammy rings and baby puff crisps, everything else which is eaten must be mashed, there is no reason that Lachlan physicaly can’t eat food the same as any other child, the problem is sensory, the slightest lump that is too big, an unfamiliar smell, a new texture or taste will result in projectile vomiting of Exorcist proportions, someone new trying too hard to help Lachlan feed himself, a sickness bug, vaccines have all resulted in Lachlan literally starving himself, where no solid food passed his lips, for up to  a full month we served and binned three meals a day, we begged, the GP, OT, Peadiatrian and Health Visitor to help us, no one knew what to do the first time it happened in the end we had to go right back to formula milk as it was all we could get Lachlan to take, this has happened on three occasions in the last two years, then slowly, painstakingly we have worked back to the mashed food, taking months to get back to where we are now.

We have long since realised it is not Lachlan doesn’t want to eat like the rest of us, he does, he loves his food so long as it remains the same, just today Lachlan acctualy said to his Dad at lunchtime “taste” while Dad was eating a banana, as soon as the banana came too close Lachlan screamed and lashed out shouting “take it away”, to watch, it is like the banana was causing Lachlan actual physical pain, it was the same a few days ago when one of the older two were eating pizza, you can see it in Lachlan’s eyes how much he wants to try it,

can you imagine the torment this is for my little boy?

can you feel his frustration?

Lachlan can name every food, fruit, vegetable and sweetie, despite the limitations Lachlan’s allergies impose on us, it is not them which stop Lachlan enjoying all the foods other children love, he has never had sweets, or a bite of an apple, or ice cream, what prevents Lachlan from trying is Autism.

Lachlan is a clever bright little boy, but he can never be still, his body twitches, he seeks movement all the time, can you imagine trying to play, trying to follow an instruction, trying to learn or just watching your favourite programme while running back and forwards, or jumping up and down, or standing on your head, at the same time as flapping your arms, go on, try it,

give it ten minutes are you exhausted?

frustrated?

What happened in your program?

How far did you get with reading your book?

That is Lachlan’s life all day long, never still, not even for long when asleep, even then he gets no peace, again this for us is Autism.

We are lucky, you could call it lucky, that we have found a way in helping Lachlan be still, it involves a weighted vest and a weighted lap pad, altogether these weigh in at 4lb’s Lachlan’s body weight is only 27lb, I am no good at maths but I am sure that is almost 15% of his overall body weight, Lachlan can manage short periods of still whiles wearing the vest and can manage to watch CBEEBIES with vest and lap pad.

Can you imagine what it feels like to wear weight like this all day long?

The downside to the weighted therapy is that it is useless in the Summer months, even in a relatively cold Scotland,  Lachlan quite literally cooks in his special vest from mid June to September cutting it’s use down considerably.

Like a lot of children with autism Lachlan has no fear of danger,

no height is too high to climb,

electrical sockets and light switches make great toys to seek out and play with,

electrical cables are great for chewing,

despite the issues with food, Lachlan will put stones, glass, metal, plastic, basically anything hard in his mouth and try to chew it, he will try to put bubble mixture, shampoo and soap in his mouth.

Lachlan appears not to notice the taste.

Lachlan wants to do headstands 6ft off the ground, my curtains are trapeze ropes!

Lachlan loves to be outside, we have to keep all doors locked at all times, as once out in the garden Lachlan wants to escape and explore.

Outside poses 1000 times more dangers than inside, we had to have our locks changed and double handles fitted to the internal doors to stop Lachlan getting out, he doesn’t understand about pavements and roads or the danger cars pose, the whole world is a giant playgound to Lachlan.

By far the most dangerous behaviour Lachlan has ever demonstrated is his attraction to water, the compulsion that washes over him is almost hypnotic he will walk out to sea, not even stopping when out of his depth, big smile on his face, he wants to walk straight into rivers, puddles and swimming pools, no fear, oblivious to our calls to stop.

Can you imagine never being able to turn your back for a nano second?

Can you imagine how it feels as parents, to have this huge overwhelming responsibility?

Can you even begin to understand how if feels to know these things may always be a real risk and that Lachlan may never understand about danger or that the compulsions may be so strong, too strong for him to resist?

Do you see why not just anyone can look after Lachlan?

Do you understand why sometimes 1:1 is not enough?

This is Autism.

Lachlan will highly likely be starting school in nappies, we have made some progress in the area of toilet training not enough though. Lachlan without nappies is a nightmare right now, he shares another habit that many autistic children share, it is caused by sensory seeking, it is soul destroying, have you worked it out yet?

Yes, I am talking about smearing!

How would you cope with that?

You nip to the toilet, the phone rings, you are trying to spend time with your other children, in the middle of the night because you didn’t waken up when Lachlan did…….

Now try cleaning up the mess whilst properly watching Lachlan.

This is Autism.

Lachlan gets overwhelmed anytime someone comes to our home, this results in him promptly trying to send visitors away, even the ones he loves are greeted with a very sad sounding “goodbye “.

Visitors also result in stimming, (self stimulatory behaviour) from Lachlan this means, running, jumping, flapping and ends with Lachlan bouncing on his trampoline, the one that lives in the middle of the living room, I no longer view it as an odd piece of furniture, it just has to be there.

We get the same reaction when we go out, lots of stimming, harder to keep contained, if a bad day, going out can result in screaming, hands on ears, eyes screwed shut, head banging and dropping to the ground, refusing to move or uncurl. We often attract an audience, people stare, or worse imply we are bad parents ” with no control”, autism is in control.

Lachlan needs to chew, it helps him concentrate, it helps him process information. We have Chewies, strong rubber chews, Lachlan chews all day somedays, they save his arms, his clothes and help stop other dangerous items going in the mouth, they look awful though, kind of like smallish dog chews.

This is Autism.

Lachlan is a little unusual in terms of having a diagnosis of Autism as he is highly social, he loves and seeks the company of others and tries so hard to communicate with everyone, his speech is improving all the time, we have little chats occasionally, When we understand Lachlan beams, his smile could light up the room.

I see it in his eyes sometimes though the frustration and hurt because we don’t understand what Lachlan is trying to say, when it all gets too much Lachlan will smash his head off the nearest hard surface, with a sickening thud, he does this as it is believed banging ones head hard, resets all the sences that have gone off into overdrive,

Can you begin to understand how awful overload must feel that it drives you to smash your own head of the nearest hard surface?

This is Autism.

Lachlan needs 24 hours a day supervision, some nights Lachlan will sleep fairly well only needing directed back to his own bed two or three times.

Other nights Lachlan is up for hours, unable to settle, he wriggles and squirms as if in discomfort, unable to say what is wrong.

Lachlan frequently needs a full change in the middle of the night, sometimes our bed needs a full change at 3.00am too. Lachlan sleeps on a tiny toddler bed at the foot of our bed, there is nowhere else safe for him to sleep, a sleeping house is a dangerous playgound for a lad like Lachlan.

What if no one wakens up when Lachlan goes wandering?

It has happened a few times, one night we found Lachlan sitting in Hamish’s room in the dark eating lego, another night Lachlan climbed up and joined Alex in her loft bed, the most frightening occasion was the night we found Lachlan sitting on the landing playing with the power sockets, his hands dripping wet from turning on and playing with the sink taps, he could have given himself an electric shock, Lachlan could have died that night.

Stop and think for a second, my little boy could have died as a result of his dangerous sensory driven behaviour.

We now keep taps tuned off at the mains at night, have double handles on the bathroom door and have placed furniture in front of nearly every socket in the house. We tried Lachlan sharing a room with Hamish, we had to give up poor Hamish was falling asleep in school due to lack of sleep.

Could you go years without a full nights sleep?

I haven’t had a full nights sleep since before Lachlan was born.

Do you know how it feels to be too frightened to fall asleep because you have to keep your child safe?

This is Autism.

Lachlan has an amazing team of professionals who support him, for Lachlan this means hours of therapy sessions, every week.

We tried to help Lachlan join the activities other pre schoolers go to, the local groups happily accept Lachlan on to thier waiting lists but despite being on some lists two years he has never been offered a place, younger children have.

I am thankful Lachlan doesn’t know he is missing out.

This is Autism.

Lachlan lives at home with his older brother Hamish 13 and his older sister Alex 9, they never complain, not ever, they do suffer too though, they no longer bring friends home to play, they know that days out have to be planned round Lachlan, they have stopped asking for cinema trips to see the latest film, ten pin bowling, sleepovers, both children have had to grow up too fast, they both help out a lot with Lachlan, they love thier little brother, they are Lachlans best friends, they play with Lachlan for hours, helping Lachlan learn, they let Lachlan run on reins with them when we are out and about, they are young carers to their brother, they don’t get thier fair share of parental attention, we are spread too thinly.

As parents and a couple there is never time for just us, we attend endless meetings, we are Lachalns voice at these meetings, making sure his needs are cared for and met to the highest standards, there are sessions with the speech therapist, home visiting teacher, OT and we still have housework, meals too cook, we spend hours every week cooking meals for Lachlan that meet his dietary requirements and we have Hamish and Alex to care for too, as well as always watching Lachlan.

We have “targets” to work on. Even when not working with professionals we are always “modelling” our language, our behaviour, constantly trying to take steps forward.

It all takes it’s toll, the stress is immense, never getting a full nights sleep, I believe the stress levels experienced by additional needs parents have been found to be as high as thoes of soldiers working in war zones, for both Ian and I this has resulted in health problems and exhaustion, in the last three months my hair has been falling out at an alarming rate, my hormones are all over the place, the cause?

stress.

I study through open learning, I somehow find time to squeeze it in, my hope and aim is to get a job locally during term time once Lachlan is settled in school. I want to build a better life for my family.

Looking at Lachlan he looks just like any other little boy, you can’t see Autism. Lachlan is a wonderful wee lad who is doing his best, thanks to the support of Lachlan’s proffesionals and the determination of Lachlan’s family and extended family, I know Lachlan will always be the best he can be.

This is our families lives with Autism.

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Autism, Our lives and Autism

A very Merry Christmas

For weeks now I have been daring to hope that this years Christmas and festive season would be a happy one, full of good memories, love and laughter, instead of the stress and heartbreak of the previous two. I have been silently praying that autism wasn’t going to get in the way or spoil things, all of us over the last year have invested so much time, energy, patience and love in helping Lachlan to learn to cope and live in our world, had we come far enough though?

Christmas is sensory nightmare for children with autism and sensory processing disorder; for a month, routine goes out the window, both at home and in nursery / school as all the preparation for Christmas begins, there are rehearsals for concerts, lights and decorations everywhere, sights and smells that can only be found at Christmas, there are the concerts of siblings to attend, friends and relatives you haven’t seen since last Christmas suddenly reappear, even just the excitement of others can be all too much for our sensitive little ones.

This year we decided that as far as possible we were going to join in the festivities as a family, all of us together, that meant Lachlan went to his sisters school fare, the school concert, had a trip to meet Santa, took part in his Playgroup’s nativity play, went to a Christmas party, attended church on Christmas Eve, got up with his siblings on Christmas morning and as much as possible joined in Christmas Day.

I bought Lachlan a little playmobil 123 nativity set and Santa and sleigh set, we looked at Christmas themed books, reading the stories, singing Carols and we all played with Lachlan’s Christmas toys with him, demonstrating and role playing, we bought Lachlan a beautiful wooden Christmas tree advent calendar where each day you added a bauble to the tree on the lead up to Christmas. We all wanted to try and help Lachlan make sense of it all.
We had no expectations of Lachlan, if he wanted to blank out Christmas then that was fine with us, we just wanted to give him the opportunity to join in as much or as little as he was happy with.

The school fare was all too much, the rest I am delighted to say were all a success, admittedly some more so than others, Lachlan enjoyed both the school concert and church service but was rather noisy through both, he did brilliantly on his visit to Santa even managing to tell Santa that he wanted a Fire Engine for Christmas and Christmas Day was more magical than I could ever have hoped for.

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On Christmas morning we all got up at 10.00am, Lachlan stopped dead on the stairs when his eyes caught site of all the presents on the couch below, his face full of wonder, a tiny little voice whispered the word “presents”.
I always try to get the children to open up one present at a time and they take it in turns, we let Hamish and Alex begin and encouraged Lachlan to take his turn, he was not too sure to begin with and on Christmas morning only a few presents were opened by Lachlan, partly because he got as far as opening his Fire Engine and Fire Station and then played happily with them for the next couple of hours totally engrossed with his new toys.

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We were having family over for Christmas dinner, for Lachlan this was going to be the next big challenge of the day, yes he knew all those coming very well but to have them all over all at once was something we had never done before. For Lachlan this was going to be an invasion of his space of epic proportions!

Lachlan took it all in his stride, he did cling a little when our guests first arrived but soon was back to playing happily with his new toys, we had decided as we were not eating at Lachlan’s usual tea time that we would eat and leave Lachlan to enjoy his toys in peace. There was a magical moment after we sat down to eat when Lachlan appeared in the kitchen, he took up a chair beside Alex and sat there happily eating a bowl of rice cakes and crisps while we ate Christmas dinner, it made me so happy that Lachlan chose to join us.

After our meal it was time to exchange gifts, Lachlan took the lead from everyone else and joined in opening all his presents, it was lovely to see his face light up when he found in each parcel a gift he liked, I was touched when Lachlan thanked everyone for his gifts too, understanding who his presents had come from, there was none of the fear or upset that presents had brought last year or the year before, all presents were opened on Christmas Day unlike last year where we finally gave in and opened gifts for Lachlan at the end of January.

At the end of the evening Lachlan seemed truly disappointed when everyone went home. Lachlan happily played on with is toys until becoming sleepy around 11.00pm, when he fell asleep cuddled into me, a happy contented little boy.

For us all I think this Christmas will always be held in our hearts and memories as Lachlan’s first Christmas.

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Autism, Our lives and Autism

Birthday Boy

“What a difference a day makes! This time last night I was in floods of tears feeling robbed and thinking way too much about what other four year olds do on their Birthdays that Lachlan wouldn’t do.

First thing this morning I sang Happy Birthday to Lachlan and he replied by saying “cake” then we had music therapy and Gill played “happy birthday” several times on keyboard much to Lachlan’s delight, we brought out the cards at lunch time and thanks to the “look who got a letter” song from Blues Clues Lachlan opened his cards with help and a huge grin.

A little while later we gave Lachlan the one wrapped present Gran and Grandpa had brought, Lachlan opened it with help from Gran and was delighted with the tractors jigsaw inside.

We then had home visiting teacher in, this was when we gave Lachlan his play table and train set, both my little and big boys have had a great time with it! At tea time Nana and Graham came and we had cake and candles and sang “happy birthday” twice, Lachlan loved investigating the candles, then Hamish gave Lachlan his present, at supper time we sang and had candles again and Alex gave Lachlan her present which both Alex and Lachlan played with for a while.

Lachlan has loved every minute of a stress free amazing day and I have no doubt he knew it was his Birthday, his special day, we achieved so much today, so much that most people take for granted, it is the little simple things that give hope and bring happiness and joy, Vxxxx”

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Autism, Our lives and Autism

The Road To Mainstream Pre School Part One

I had enrolled Lachlan in our local playgroup before his initial assessment, Lachlan was due to start in August 2013, I had spoken to staff when enrolling and explained about Lachlan still not speaking and that we were waiting on assessments, after the EYCAT assessment I had to make the call explaining that Lachlan’s problems were much bigger than we had realised, it was agreed Lachlan would start playgroup 7 months earlier than intended 2 afternoons a week in a small group of 2-3 year olds, the idea was Lachlan would have time to get to know playgroup the staff and children and for them to get to know Lachlan it was also hoped that in time learn to be away from Ian and I.

I think it fair to say that on that first afternoon in January both Lachlan and I were completely unprepared and over whelmed, I never realised how traumatic a change starting playgroup was to be for all of us. I came home that day and sobbed for hours vowing never to put either of us through that again, I never realised how hard it would be or how much it could hurt to spend an afternoon playing with other children, my older two had both gone to the same playgroup and I had always loved playing with the other children when my turn on the rota came round, this was not going to be the same, this was the first time Lachlan and I had spent time with children Lachlan’s age in over a year, there it was, suddenly clearer than ever before just how far behind Lachlan was and also how different. The other children could talk, they could eat normal food, they played with each other and they asked questions.

Thankfully our health visitor had foreseen what I hadn’t and called to help pick up the pieces, she helped to convince us to go back the next day and called regularly over the following weeks, sometimes it is not until you find yourself in a situation do you realise how complicated a situation it is or how much is being asked of you or just how much you are asking of others.

It suddenly struck me how vulnerable Lachlan was, I realised I was going to have to place an enormous amount of trust and faith in the playgroup staff, I realised Lachlan was not going to be able to tell me if something was wrong, he was not going to be able to tell someone if he was hurt, or if he needed or wanted something and it terrified me.  We were at this point, just about getting by at home, with Lachlan taking us to everything he wanted or pointing and making very determined sounding tones but in an unknown environment that wasn’t going to work.

That first afternoon Lachlan clung to me in playgroup with his hands on his ears we tried to join in but every activity we went to sparked off tears and very stressed sounding goodbyes from Lachlan. The next day was better, the next week worse, Lachlan and I found ourselves on a bit of a roller-coaster of highs and lows over the coming weeks, for every step forward there would be one back, part of the problem was we were all learning, Lachlan was learning how to be somewhere new with other children and adults, the staff were all learning about Lachlan and global developmental delay and the autistic spectrum as was I at home, it was awful due to the lacking services being asked questions about why Lachlan did things or what Lachlan needed and not really knowing the answer.

Reluctantly at the end of February I asked our GP for a referral to be made to Social Work to try and make some headway in terms of support for us all. I will be honest and say at that point I strongly believed Lachlan needed to be in a specialist educational provision, he just didn’t belong in mainstream, it felt a bit like trying to fit a square peg into a round hole, no matter how hard we all worked at it, it just wasn’t happening. Lachlan was so stressed all the time, he wouldn’t eat, either wouldn’t sleep or would sleep all the time, wouldn’t wear clothes, was banging his head all the time, I hated seeing him so distressed and miserable.

I called the education department to ask what additional support Lachlan was entitled to and to ask about how to apply for a specialist setting, as Lachlan was not yet 3 he was not entitled to any support at all and Lachlan could only attend a specialist setting if referred there usually after a period of time in mainstream.  I arranged for us to visit the SEN nursery 20 miles away from our home, there are only 2 in our region the other is 30 miles away, it was very impressive and everything I could have wanted for Lachlan, they had classes of only 6 children all children had 1:1 care, everything was laid out and designed with additional needs children in mind, there were sensory areas, outdoor areas, there were picture cards everywhere, it felt very right, the children there were just like Lachlan too. I went home and asked again for a placing request to be made for Lachlan we were then dealt the blow that integrated children’s services would never agree to fund a child Lachlan’s age traveling so far in escorted transport plus Lachlan’s needs were not in their eyes great enough to warrant a place. I never was happy with the idea of handing Lachlan over to strangers to get to and from nursery my intention was, had we been offered a place I would escort. It was awful feeling Lachlan didn’t belong anywhere. We had to find a way to make playgroup work.

A huge turning point came when Lachlan’s grandparents bought him a weighted vest, very quickly Lachlan became a much calmer little boy, I will never forget the afternoon he first sat still for more than a minute; Something Special had come on TV and Lachlan had stopped to look, that day for the first time he stayed and watched the whole episode, it was as if before the vest Lachlan couldn’t bear to sit or be still, suddenly Lachlan could concentrate on taking part, suddenly Lachlan and I could do puzzles and play.

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Autism

Life for Lachlan 0-6 months

This is Lachlan,

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12 days old

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8 weeks old

Life has never been easy for Lachlan, as parents we often felt hopeless, we hated to see him suffering, in the early days Lachlan screamed endlessly night and day, puked constantly, suffered horrendous constipation, I remember the first time he slept four hours at about five weeks our, during the night.  I also learned what being asleep before you head hits the pillow really meant, yet if Lachlan had an appointment or someone came into visit he would sleep soundly, due to being a breech baby we had to go for a hip scan with Lachlan, we were able to undress him, he had his scan and we redressed him and he never stirred, it did unnerve me at the time, what do you do though when everyone keeps telling you it is nothing to worry about? We could bath Lachlan and he wouldn’t stir, getting him to feed was hard too, he was either screaming or sleeping, breast feeding was a nightmare as Lachlan seemed to hate being on his side, so tummy to mummy was a disaster and that was before I cut out everything from my diet to try and ease his tummy problems, at times love was all we had to give and it wasn’t enough, once the early issues of milk allergy, eye issues, tongue tie and reflux were dealt with the wheeze and skin problems persisted, we tried inhalers, every cream and ointment there was nothing that worked, then there was the routine vaccinations which unlike my other two who were grizzly for a day or so, floored Lachlan for up to two weeks, he would scream for hours, it got so bad that the vaccinations routinely given together at 2, 3 and 4 months were given individually and finally completed at 20 months, it took so long because Lachlan was never well enough to have them. We were referred to a dietician when Lachlan was 6 months as there were other dietary issues becoming apparent, Lachlan was prescribed a dairy, egg, gluten and soya free diet, for us although difficult to live with this was a little miracle, within six weeks the wheeze was gone and his skin healed, we finally had a happy baby.

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6 months old

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